The Strike and its Enemies by Seth Ackerman
Why  did the STRIKE decline from its position as the central tool for labor  union struggles?   Read this insightful article to find out, and to be  reminded why we should say “labor is not a commodity.”  Strike, occupy,  shut down production! 

What is refreshing about Burns’s approach is that he rejects the  fatalism of both the union bureaucrats and anti-union radicals. Instead,  he makes a practical yet audacious proposal for breaking free from the  system of labor control so that workers can once again directly  challenge the dominance of their employers’ property rights.
He argues that a militant current within the existing unions could  support the creation of independent worker organizations possessing no  assets and no property. These organizations would be able to violate  Taft-Hartley and other laws: to strike and organize using tactics that  defy the authorities and target the shutdown of production without fear  of losing years of accumulated strike funds in lawsuits or court fines.

read more at Jacobin magazine

The Strike and its Enemies by Seth Ackerman

Why did the STRIKE decline from its position as the central tool for labor union struggles? Read this insightful article to find out, and to be reminded why we should say “labor is not a commodity.” Strike, occupy, shut down production!

What is refreshing about Burns’s approach is that he rejects the fatalism of both the union bureaucrats and anti-union radicals. Instead, he makes a practical yet audacious proposal for breaking free from the system of labor control so that workers can once again directly challenge the dominance of their employers’ property rights.

He argues that a militant current within the existing unions could support the creation of independent worker organizations possessing no assets and no property. These organizations would be able to violate Taft-Hartley and other laws: to strike and organize using tactics that defy the authorities and target the shutdown of production without fear of losing years of accumulated strike funds in lawsuits or court fines.

read more at Jacobin magazine